Untitled 1
  • BIOS

    • Charlie Anderson

      There is little question that Charlie Anderson is the best basketball player to ever play at Mark Smith High School during its six-year history that ran from 1965 through 1970, which was also Anderson’s senior year. In 1970, Mark Smith merged with Peter G. Appling and Lassiter to form Northeast High School. The 6-foot-4 Anderson led the Mark Smith Bulldogs to their only state championship in any sport, guiding them to an unexpected Class 3A basketball title his junior year in 1968-69. In the state playoffs en route to the championship game, the bulldogs faced Beach High School of Savannah in a quarterfinal matchup, and to tell you how little they were respected, Beach coach Russell Ellington asked a reporter “Where is Mark Smith?” He soon found out as Mark Smith defeated the tournament-favorite Savannah team 52-49. The Bulldogs advanced to the finals, beating Price of Atlanta 56-52 in the semifinals. They went up against a talented and much taller Carver-Columbus squad, led by 7-footer “Fessor” Leonard, in the finals but edged the heavily favored Tigers 72-71 in double-overtime at Alexander Memorial Coliseum in Atlanta for the state title. Carver beat the Bulldogs 76-59 two weeks earlier in the region finals. Anderson led the way with 32 points in the championship game and was named the MVP of the state tournament. Mark Smith finished that campaign with a 27-4 record. During his senior season, Anderson averaged 19 points per game, which helped him earn a basketball scholarship to the University of Georgia, where he played for Ken Rosemond for three seasons and John Guthrie for one. Anderson was a three-year letterman for the Bulldogs and the team captain his senior season when he averaged 14.3 points and 6.3 rebounds per game. During his career at Georgia, he averaged 8.8 points per game. He had a career high 36 points in a game against Auburn University. Anderson spent one year playing professionally for Brest in France. (more)

  • NEWS

      No news items to display.